Chapter 28. Samba

Contents

28.1. Terminology
28.2. Starting and Stopping Samba
28.3. Configuring a Samba Server
28.4. Configuring Clients
28.5. Samba as Login Server
28.6. For More Information

Abstract

Using Samba, a Unix machine can be configured as a file and print server for DOS, Windows, and OS/2 machines. Samba has developed into a fully-fledged and rather complex product. Configure Samba with YaST, SWAT (a Web interface), or the configuration file.


28.1. Terminology

SMB protocol

Samba uses the SMB (server message block) protocol that is based on the NetBIOS services. Due to pressure from IBM, Microsoft released the protocol so other software manufacturers could establish connections to a Microsoft domain network. With Samba, the SMB protocol works on top of the TCP/IP protocol, so the TCP/IP protocol must be installed on all clients.

CIFS protocol

CIFS (common Internet file system) protocol is another protocol supported by Samba. CIFS defines a standard remote file system access protocol for use over the network, enabling groups of users to work together and share documents across the network.

NetBIOS

NetBIOS is a software interface (API) designed for communication between machines. Here, a name service is provided. It enables machines connected to the network to reserve names for themselves. After reservation, these machines can be addressed by name. There is no central process that checks names. Any machine on the network can reserve as many names as it wants as long as the names are not already in use. The NetBIOS interface can now be implemented for different network architectures. An implementation that works relatively closely with network hardware is called NetBEUI, but this is often referred to as NetBIOS. Network protocols implemented with NetBIOS are IPX from Novell (NetBIOS via TCP/IP) and TCP/IP.

The NetBIOS names sent via TCP/IP have nothing in common with the names used in /etc/hosts or those defined by DNS. NetBIOS uses its own, completely independent naming convention. However, it is recommended to use names that correspond to DNS hostnames to make administration easier. This is the default used by Samba.

Samba server

Samba server is a server that provides SMB/CIFS services and NetBIOS over IP naming services to clients. For Linux, there are two daemons for Samba server: smnd for SMB/CIFS services and nmbd for naming services.

Samba client

Samba client is a system that uses Samba services from a Samba server over the SMB protocol. All common operating systems, such as Mac OS X, Windows, and OS/2, support the SMB protocol. The TCP/IP protocol must be installed on all computers. Samba provides a client for the different UNIX flavors. For Linux, there is a kernel module for SMB that allows the integration of SMB resources on the Linux system level. You do not need run any daemon for Samba client.

Shares

SMB servers provide hardware space to their clients by means of shares. Shares are printers and directories with their subdirectories on the server. It is exported by means of a name and can be accessed by its name. The share name can be set to any name—it does not have to be the name of the export directory. A printer is also assigned a name. Clients can access the printer by its name.